"His playing presents a delicious paradox... individualistic almost to the point of recreation, while so utterly natural, so profoundly honest, you could hardly imagine the music otherwise. [Beethoven Variations[: tautness of playing, absolute rhythmic security, burbling pianissimos, knife-edged sforzandos, artful rubato and unremitting sense of purpose... delicate observations occur by the bar... [trans-criptions]: (Mendelssohn; Rimsky-Korsakov; Tchaikovsky): scintillating, full of musical interest. His reworking of Liebesleid is extremely beautiful. [his own music]... each sounds as if spontaneously improvised... The C sharp minor Prelude retains it's magic through perfect timing. That is perhaps where Rachmaninov remains most inimitable: it wasn't how he struck the keys that mattered, but when." (Gramophone)
"His playing presents a delicious paradox... individualistic almost to the point of recreation, while so utterly natural, so profoundly honest, you could hardly imagine the music otherwise. [Beethoven Variations[: tautness of playing, absolute rhythmic security, burbling pianissimos, knife-edged sforzandos, artful rubato and unremitting sense of purpose... delicate observations occur by the bar... [trans-criptions]: (Mendelssohn; Rimsky-Korsakov; Tchaikovsky): scintillating, full of musical interest. His reworking of Liebesleid is extremely beautiful. [his own music]... each sounds as if spontaneously improvised... The C sharp minor Prelude retains it's magic through perfect timing. That is perhaps where Rachmaninov remains most inimitable: it wasn't how he struck the keys that mattered, but when." (Gramophone)
5055354409028

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Format: CD
Rel. Date: 06/11/2021
UPC: 5055354409028

Sergei Rachmaninov the Pianist
Format: CD
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Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Prelude C-Sharp minor (Morceaux de Fantaisie, Op.3/2) (4/1928)
2. Prelude, Op.32/6 in F minor: Allegro Appassionato (3/1940)
3. Beethoven: Variations on Original Theme in C minor, Woo 80 (Excerpts) (4/1924 to 5/1925)
4. Chopin: Ballade No.3 in A-Flat Major, Op.47 (13/4/1925)
5. Chopin: Waltz No.7 in C-Sharp minor, Op.64 No.2 (5/4/1927)
6. Chopin: Waltz No.8 in A-Flat Major, Op.64 No.3 (5/4/1927)
7. Mendelssohn's 'Scherzo' (A Midsummer Night's Dream Op.61) Arr. for Piano Rachmaninov, 1933 (23/12/1935)
8. Rimsky-Korsakov's 'Flight of the Bumblebee' ('The Tale of the Tsar Sultan') Arr. for Piano Rachmaninov, 1929 (4/1929)
9. Tchaikovsky: Troïka (The Seasons, Op.37A X1)(11/4/1928)
10. Carl Tausig: Valse-Caprice No. 2 (Nouvelle Soirées de Vienne) for Piano: 'Man Lebt Nur Einmal' (After Strauss JR, Op.167) (4/19
11. Kreisler's 'Liebeslied' for Piano, TN Iii/5 (25/10/1921) (Arr. Rachmaninov 1921 from Alt-Wiener Tanzweisen No.1) V Rachmaninov:
12. Moderato 9:46
13. Track 13
14. Adagio Sostenuto
15. Track 15
16. Allegro Scherzando

More Info:

"His playing presents a delicious paradox... individualistic almost to the point of recreation, while so utterly natural, so profoundly honest, you could hardly imagine the music otherwise. [Beethoven Variations[: tautness of playing, absolute rhythmic security, burbling pianissimos, knife-edged sforzandos, artful rubato and unremitting sense of purpose... delicate observations occur by the bar... [trans-criptions]: (Mendelssohn; Rimsky-Korsakov; Tchaikovsky): scintillating, full of musical interest. His reworking of Liebesleid is extremely beautiful. [his own music]... each sounds as if spontaneously improvised... The C sharp minor Prelude retains it's magic through perfect timing. That is perhaps where Rachmaninov remains most inimitable: it wasn't how he struck the keys that mattered, but when." (Gramophone)