The Centone di Sonate M.S. 112 is the last organic collection of sonate for violin and guitar composed by Paganini. The drawing up of this work, which is formed of 18 sonate evenly divided into three booklets (marked a, b and c) as was customary for a publication, probably began in Prague towards the end of 1828 and went on for several 11 years, during Paganini's tour in Europe. It seems likely that the title Centone was attributed to the manuscripts after the composer's death, during an operation of rearrangement of the unpublished material, with the purpose of generally indicating a collection of various pieces. Gianfranco Iannetta on violin and Walter Zanetti on guitar offer us the first six sonatas of the collection in a recording that for the first time is based solely on Paganini's autographed manuscripts.
The Centone di Sonate M.S. 112 is the last organic collection of sonate for violin and guitar composed by Paganini. The drawing up of this work, which is formed of 18 sonate evenly divided into three booklets (marked a, b and c) as was customary for a publication, probably began in Prague towards the end of 1828 and went on for several 11 years, during Paganini's tour in Europe. It seems likely that the title Centone was attributed to the manuscripts after the composer's death, during an operation of rearrangement of the unpublished material, with the purpose of generally indicating a collection of various pieces. Gianfranco Iannetta on violin and Walter Zanetti on guitar offer us the first six sonatas of the collection in a recording that for the first time is based solely on Paganini's autographed manuscripts.
8007194107340
Centone Di Sonate
Artist: Paganini
Format: CD
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The Centone di Sonate M.S. 112 is the last organic collection of sonate for violin and guitar composed by Paganini. The drawing up of this work, which is formed of 18 sonate evenly divided into three booklets (marked a, b and c) as was customary for a publication, probably began in Prague towards the end of 1828 and went on for several 11 years, during Paganini's tour in Europe. It seems likely that the title Centone was attributed to the manuscripts after the composer's death, during an operation of rearrangement of the unpublished material, with the purpose of generally indicating a collection of various pieces. Gianfranco Iannetta on violin and Walter Zanetti on guitar offer us the first six sonatas of the collection in a recording that for the first time is based solely on Paganini's autographed manuscripts.